Time God

“The world and society in 1913 looked like this: life is completely confined and shackled. A kind of economic fatalism prevails; each individual, whether he resists it or not, is assigned a specific role and with it his interests and his character. The church is regarded as a ‘redemption factory’ of little importance, literature as a safety valve… The most burning question day and night is: is there anywhere a force that is strong enough to put an end to this state of affairs? And if not, how can one escape it?” ~Hugo Ball

“You should worship only one God. The other Gods are unimportant. Abraxas is to be feared. Therefore it was a deliverance when he separated himself from me. You do not need to seek him. He will find you, just like Eros. He is the God of the cosmos, extremely powerful and fearful. He is the creative drive, he is form and formation, just as much as matter and force, therefore he is above all the light and dark Gods. He tears away souls and casts them into procreation. He is the creative and created. He is the God who always renews himself in days, in months, in years, in human life, in ages, in peoples, in the living, in heavenly bodies. He compels, he is unsparing. If you worship him, you increase his power over you. Thereby it becomes unbearable. You will have dreadful trouble getting clear of him. The more you free yourself from him, the more you approach death, since he is the life of the universe. But he is also universal death. Therefore you fall victim to him again, not in life but in dying. So remember him, do not worship him, but also do not imagine that you can flee him since he is all around you. You must be in the middle of life, surrounded by death on all sides. Stretched out, like one crucified, you hang in him, the fearful, the overpowering.”

“But you have in you the one God, the wonderfully beautiful and kind, the solitary, starlike, unmoving, he who is older and wiser than the father, he who has a safe hand, who leads you among all the darknesses and death scares of dreadful Abraxas. He gives joy and peace, since he is beyond death and beyond what is subject to change. He is no servant and no friend of Abraxas. He himself is an Abraxas, but not unto you, but in himself and his distant world, since you yourself are a God who lives in faraway realms and who renews himself in his ages and creations and peoples, just as powerful to them as Abraxas is to you.”
~from “The Red Book, Liber Novus” by C.G. Jung, incarnated watcher, “fallen angel”

“In 1932, Jung commented on Abraxas: ‘the Gnostic symbol Abraxas, a made-up name meaning three hundred and sixty-five… the Gnostics used it as the name of their supreme deity. He was a time god. The philosophy of Bergson, la durée créatrice, is an expression of the same idea.’ Jung described him in a way that echoes his description here: ‘just as this archetypal world of the collective unconscious is exceedingly paradoxical, always yea and nay; that figure of Abraxas means the beginning and the end, it is life and death, therefore it is represented by a monstrous figure. It is a monster because it is the life of vegetation in the course of one year, the spring and the autumn, the summer and the winter, the yea and nay of nature. So Abraxas is really identical with the Demiurgos, the world creator. And as such he is surely identical with the Purusha, or with Shiva.’ Jung added that ‘Abraxas is usually represented with the head of a fowl, the body of a man, and the tail of a serpent, but there is also the lion-headed symbol with a dragon’s body; the head crowned with the twelve rays, alluding to the number of months.’ According to St. Irenaeus, Basilides held that ‘the ruler of them is named Abrasaks, and that is why this (ruler) has the number 365 within it.’ Abraxas featured in Albrecht Dieterich’s work, Abraxas. Studien zur Religionsgeschichte des spiitern Altertums.”
~from “Liber Novus: The ‘Red Book’ of C.G. Jung” by Sonu Shamdasani

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